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Delicious Cabbage

Multiple Carrot Sizes

Family Owned & Operated

Grown in Sunny Colorado

Delicious Carrots

Farm Fresh Colorado Produce

HUNGENBERG PRODUCE

Over 100 Years of Growing Colorado Fresh Vegetables!

hungenberg produce

Hungenberg Produce has been happy to bring fresh vegetables to the people of Colorado. For nearly 30 years Hungenberg’s has specialized in the production of Carrots and Cabbage. We offer a full line of cello, baby peeled and premium carrots (shred, chip, and petite). Hungenberg Produce strives to use the latest technology in cutting, peeling, and bagging systems as well as setting standards above and beyond the norm when it comes to food safety. We get great satisfaction in bringing our customers the best quality products on the market.

We are proud to bring fresh produce to the Weld County area as well as across the state of Colorado.  Being a family owned company we put our hard work into growing only the freshest vegetables. Please feel free to take a look around our website. If you have any questions click here to contact us

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Company History
hungenberg produceIn 1904 Emily Hungenberg’s husband passed away. She picked up everything she owned, which wasn’t much, along with her 3 boys, Fred, Edward, and John, and She left Tuscarora, Nevada and moved to Greeley, Colorado. She bought 7 acres of land in 1907, and the Hungenberg’s began farming in 1908. Edward was young, but worked hard growing sugar beets, among other root crops. As time passed, Fred and John showed little interest in the farm – leaving the farm work to Edward. Edward married Ruth Baker on May 29, 1926 – and had 2 boys of his own, Don and Ken Hungenberg. Edward added another 10 acres, and added onion sets, watermelons and cantaloupes to his farm. Struggling through the Depression, they managed to add a few more acres – selling vegetables on a road side stand, and keeping the unsold produce in a dugout to be sold later in the year.

Through the late 30’s and 40’s they added a few more crops – sweet corn, cabbage, radishes, a few rows of red beets, and turnips. In the late 40’s, Edward and Don narrowed their crops to a few weather dependable and resilient crops, including carrots. Edward built his own packing house and began packing his own produce. This was when stores began buying directly from producers, saving Edward transportation time, and increasing revenue. Most every piece of produce was sold in bushel baskets…. Click to Read More